Sunday, August 24, 2014

Letting Your Fans Do The Marketing

It seems counter-intuitive, but limiting who you sell to is actually a great way to amplify word-of-mouth for the item.  But it all starts with having a product worth talking about.

A company that's figured this out is OnePlus.net. They let their fans do the marketing for them.  Anyone that purchases a One Plus phone is given invitations to give to their friends and family to buy.

As always, I'd love to hear your thoughts on this topic and any other interesting marketing-related musings.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

McCafe Goes To The Grocery Store

Looks like just another brand name on the shelf.  Even if loyalty to the McCafe brand is Kraft and McDonald's expectation, what does McDonald's stand to gain by taking the traffic out of the restaurant and moving it to the grocery store?

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Art Everywhere Takes Over A Billboard Near You


Look up at a billboard this month and you may be surprised by what you see - marketers are being replaced by masterpieces.

The Art Everywhere campaign is a cool idea that's temporarily repurposing 50,000 annoying, noisy outdoor ads with classic works of art.  The project is a collaboration with the Outdoor Advertising Association of America and the Art Institute of Chicago, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., and the Whitney Museum in New York.

I love the idea of placing a work of art where one might expect to find an ad because the element of surprise should help to capture people's attention in the future.  It's especially better than the ads for ads that are typically placed on unused inventory.  

But I think the Art Everywhere campaign could be improved if the art was an even greater focal point.  In some cases, the works of art only comprise two-thirds of the space; therefore, they wind up looking not very different than any other billboard - featuring a (perhaps) unfamiliar image and a few words of too-small-to-read copy. 

While I understand that this campaign isn't completely about filling America's galleries (the ad association wants to show off its technology), I believe a different execution, particularly on the billboards, could have been more captivating and still prove better results for the advertisers and media companies.

As always, I'd love to hear your thoughts on this topic and any other interesting marketing-related musings.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Bellroy Is A Brand To Watch

I think owning a Bellroy wallet is in my future. 

I recently stumbled across a fantastic internet banner ad (yes, that type of banner ad) for a slimmer-type of wallet.  The was striking because of its the effective visual used to convey their brand purpose and point of differentiation - to slim your wallet.

When I went their webpage, I discovered that they maintain this great use of using visuals (in both pictures and videos) to sell the product throughout the site.  

Solving a problem is fundamental for any strong brand.  Bellroy wallets solve the problem of a cumbersome wallet without sacrificing its contents.  Their great use of visuals demonstrate in their ads just how Bellroy is solving this problem.  Bellroy has the strategy and tactic all wrapped up.

As always, I'd love to hear your thoughts on this topic and any other interesting marketing-related musings.
 

Monday, August 4, 2014

P&G Trims The Brand Fat

Last week, Procter & Gamble announced that it will be divesting around 100 of its lesser known (or purchased) brands in order to refocus on the most successful ones.

Although this may sound like a company going backward, I wholeheartedly believe this move will prove to be a giant leap forward.  This is hard evidence of a stronger brand strategy that will create more defined brands for customers instead of confusing them with overlapping brands with murky brand positions.  It appears that P&G's leadership has realizes that playing the chasing growth outside of its core will ultimately land them out of position to grow within it.   

I've argued for a long time that adding brands and brand extensions would catch up with P&G.  It creates more noise and kills the meaning of a brand.

A brand diet will be healthy thing for P&G. 

As always, I'd love to hear your thoughts on this topic and any other interesting marketing-related musings.